UK court orders Dubai ruler to pay record amount to ex-wife and children


Princess Haya Bint al Hussein of Jordan leaves a court in London on July 31, 2019. afp_tickers

This content was published on December 21, 2021 – 13:23

(AFP)

The ruler of Dubai, Mohamed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, was ordered by a British court on Tuesday to pay his ex-wife and their children some 550 million pounds (about 725 million dollars), the highest divorce compensation awarded. by an English court.

Judge Philip Moor ordered the 72-year-old Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates to pay some 251.5 million pounds ($340 million) to his sixth wife, Princess Haya of Jordan, 47, and 290 million pounds ($385 million) to cover support for their children, aged 9 and 14, as well as other expenses, including security.

According to the judgment on Tuesday, the amount which includes tens of thousands of pounds for holidays or pet-related expenses could vary depending on a variety of factors, such as whether the children reconcile with their father.

“Given their position and the general threats of terrorism and kidnapping they face in such circumstances, they are considered particularly vulnerable and in need of enhanced security safeguards in this country,” Judge Moor said in a statement. his verdict.

“The main threat they face comes from the (leader) himself, not from outside sources,” he added.

– Record financial compensation –

The High Court ruled last October that Mohamed bin Rashid al Maktoum authorized the hacking of his wife’s phone and those of his British lawyers.

It has not been proven that such events were linked to the legal battle in the United Kingdom between his wife and him, who wants to obtain the return of his two children to Dubai, but a “very important” volume of data has been excerpt from the princess’ file. mobile, approximately 265 megabytes — the equivalent of 24 hours of voice recording or 500 photos.

The magistrate also pointed out that the sovereign had “harassed and intimidated the mother (of his children) before his departure for England and since his arrival”, and that he was “willing to tolerate those who acted on his behalf in the UK did it illegally.”

The financial compensation measures agreed on Tuesday are among the largest so far granted in a divorce agreement before British courts since the case of the ex-wife of Russian billionaire Farjad Ajmedov, Tatiana Ajmedova.

At the end of 2016, the court awarded Ajmedova 41% of her ex-husband’s fortune, which represents 453 million pounds (nearly 600 million dollars).

Tuesday’s sentencing also highlights the luxurious lifestyle of the ruler of Dubai’s family. Before they left the Emirati city, Al Maktoum paid them more than 100 million pounds a year (over $132 million).

– Five cars –

Princess Haya, the half-sister of King Abdullah II of Jordan, lives in London’s affluent Kensington neighborhood and owns another property on the outskirts of the city. Before trial, he presented evidence in court showing annual expenditure of £14million, including the purchase of five cars last year. He financed them by selling jewelry or horses.

A spokesman for Mohamed bin Rashid Al Maktoum said on Tuesday that the ruler of Dubai “has always ensured that his children are free from want”.

“The court has now rendered its decision on the financial aspect and it does not intend to express itself further”, continued this spokesperson, specifying that the sovereign “asks the media to respect the private life of his children and not to not interfere in his life in the UK”.

In March 2020, a family court found that Al Maktoum “ordered and orchestrated” the abduction of two of his children, Princess Shamsha and her sister Latifa, from another wife.

Princess Latifa, who unsuccessfully tried to flee Dubai by boat in 2018, said she was being held “hostage” by her father. Last June, he said he was free “to travel” through his law firm.

Latifa had urged British police to reinvestigate the 2000 abduction of her sister Shamsha in Cambridge, in a letter dated 2018 and revealed in 2021 by the BBC.

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